“So Be It, See To It.”

Yesterday’s post on Radio Imagination at the Armory Center for the Arts focused on one artists creative interpretation of Octavia Butler’s famous novels, Kindred.  The show also featured digital snapshots of Butler’s papers currently catalogued at the Huntington Library in Pasadena.  Manuscripts, character sketches, childhood stories, and journal entries all provide us with an expositive look into Butler’s creative process including … Continue reading “So Be It, See To It.”

Truth Sellers: My Thoughts on Loss, 2016 & Lucrative Appropriation

We’re finally closing out 2016 and I know am not alone in saying this: I’m tired. Last month I saw this Sam Durant looming over one of the LACMA galleries as diners were eating al fresco in the courtyard enjoying wine at Ray’s and Stark Bar. Around the same time my Instagram feed was flooded with Basel pictures, including Durant’s popular “End … Continue reading Truth Sellers: My Thoughts on Loss, 2016 & Lucrative Appropriation

In Memoriam: The Legacy of David Mancuso

In San Francisco in the 1990’s, the club scene fell into one of two camps:  the heavily promoted, large scale parties at Club Townsend and the Sound Factory or the smaller word-of-mouth underground parties like Informal Nation, the Beer Cellar and Sophies, (Raves rested somewhere between the two). My world revolved around the underground.  You wouldn’t hear about … Continue reading In Memoriam: The Legacy of David Mancuso

The Price of Passage: Betye Saar at Roberts & Tilton

The human brain works as a binary computer and can only analyze the exact information-based zeros and ones (or black and white). Our heart is more like a chemical computer that uses fuzzy logic to analyze information that can’t be easily defined in zeros and ones. ~Naveen Jain One world deals in absolutes: “Black vs White” … Continue reading The Price of Passage: Betye Saar at Roberts & Tilton

Common Reveals Hip Hop’s Lost Soul

The beautifully close cropped faces staring into the camera for Common’s latest video for Black America Again dare the viewer to look each subject directly in the eye.  Their gaze is strong,  inquisitive and evocative;  you quickly get the sense that their gaze is knowingly somehow directed at you, challenging you to see them as complex individuals with unique stories, … Continue reading Common Reveals Hip Hop’s Lost Soul